Technology

2 minutes read
To get digits past the decimal point in Elixir, you can use the div and rem functions to extract the whole number and fractional parts of a number. Alternatively, you can convert the number to a string and use string manipulation functions to achieve the desired result. Another option is to use the :erlang.float_to_binary function to convert the float to a binary and then manipulate the binary representation to extract the digits you need.What is the precision of arithmetic operations in Elixir.
4 minutes read
To format a number to a certain precision in Elixir, you can use the :erlang.float_to_binary/2 function. This function takes two arguments: the number you want to format, and the precision you want to round it to.For example, if you want to format the number 3.14159 to two decimal places, you can use the following code:formatted_number = :erlang.float_to_binary(3.14159, [{:decimals, 2}])This will return a string "3.14" which is the number rounded to two decimal places.
4 minutes read
In Elixir, constants can be defined globally in a module and used throughout your codebase, including in your tests. To use constants in your tests, you can define them at the top of your test module, or within a specific test case.
5 minutes read
Translating a curl command to Elixir using the httpoison library involves creating a new HTTP request with the appropriate method, headers, and parameters. The curl command can be broken down into its individual components such as the URL, method (GET, POST, etc.), headers (-H flag), and data (-d flag).For example, a simple curl command like this:curl -X GET https://api.example.comCan be translated to Elixir using httpoison like this: response = HTTPoison.get("https://api.example.
3 minutes read
The capture operator in Elixir, represented by the & symbol, is used to create anonymous functions in a concise and readable way. This operator allows developers to define a function without explicitly naming it or using the fn keyword. By using the capture operator, it becomes easier to pass functions as arguments, store them in variables, or compose them inline with other functions.
5 minutes read
In Elixir, the best way of error handling is to use the combination of try/rescue and pattern matching. This allows developers to gracefully handle errors and failures in their code by specifying different scenarios in the catch blocks. By using pattern matching, developers can ensure that their error handling logic is executed only when a specific condition is met.
6 minutes read
To write a file per chunk in a stream in Elixir, you can use the Enum.chunk_every/2 function to break the stream into chunks of a specified size. Then, you can iterate over each chunk and write it to a separate file using the File.open/2 and IO.binwrite/2 functions. This allows you to write the stream to multiple files, each containing a chunk of the original data.
3 minutes read
In Elixir, you can use the Regex.scan/2 function to find words in a string using regular expressions. This function takes a regular expression as the first argument and the string you want to search as the second argument.For example, if you want to find all words that contain the letter 'a' in a given string, you can use the following code: input = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" words_with_a = Regex.scan(~r/\b\w*a\w*\b/, input) |> Enum.map(&List.
6 minutes read
In Elixir, you can fetch different dependencies for different environments by specifying them in the Mix file. Inside the mix.exs file, you can define dependencies based on the environment like :dev, :test, or :prod.For example, you can specify development-only dependencies that are not necessary for production by using the :only option. This allows you to install and fetch different dependencies based on the environment your application is running in.
6 minutes read
The =~ operator in Elixir is used for pattern matching in strings. It allows you to match a regular expression pattern against a string and return true if there is a match, or false if there isn't. This operator is commonly used in Elixir for parsing and manipulating strings based on specific patterns or criteria.What are some common mistakes to avoid when using the =~ operator in Elixir.